Science versus Spirituality: Unnecessary Duel

Only two ways to live life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” – Albert Einstein

by Nicolas Raymond

by Nicolas Raymond

I love this quote, the sentiment behind it. I posted it on social media, and one response suggested I “read science” for miracles.  Not entirely sure what that was about, but it reminded me of one of the oddities about what I do for a living, a perception that eternally puzzles me and sometimes grates.

Why on Earth do people act as if science and spirituality are incompatible? 

Science is about the process of questioning, observing and cataloging the occurrences and forces in our universe, seeking greater understanding.

Spirituality is about the process of questioning, observing and (for some) cataloging the occurrences and forces in our universe, seeking greater understanding.

The biggest difference I can distinguish right off is that science looks for outer proof, where spirituality more often focuses on inner proof.

How are these two processes not naturally complimentary?

Science looks to determine, and in some cases manipulate, the laws governing how the universe works. So does magic! Science is interested in quantifiable, reproducible data. So is magic. I guess any published results are written up different places, though, ’cause us Woo-Woo folks don’t get much respect. Ha!

The “science” of today is quite directly the “miracles and magic” of yesterday. It really is that simple. So by my calculations, my miracles and magic are tomorrow’s science.

I like being ahead of the curve.

Good science, revolutionary science, scientific work that actually changes paradigms is done to investigate and obtain better understanding as opposed to an exercise of going through the motions with an agenda of proving a point to “the gullible.”

Quite frankly, both camps could learn from each other. The skeptics could open themselves up to the possibility some reality may exist outside their current conceptual framework. Isn’t what you don’t know supposed to be the most exciting to a scientifically curious mind?  Woo-woo folks could really stand to develop more of a critical approach to evaluating information and experiences. There is a reason people often assume us crazy–because sometimes, we can come off that way!

I personally look at my own observations and experiences to determine what “reality” is about for me. And yes, I’m quite aware of the irony of putting the word reality in quotes. Honestly, sometimes I feel like the quotes should be mandatory, at least conceptually. I know what I “know” today and what I “knew” yesterday are wildly divergent. What I “know” tomorrow? It will be different still, at least if I’m living right.

Reality is an ever-shifting concept and I, for one, am not arrogant enough to assume I’ve got it all covered, or could do so in this lifetime. But I’m also looking forward to my time in the green room, waiting for the next lifetime to see if I can fill in some of the blanks.

This is how I reconcile science with the woo. How do you do it–or do you feel the need?

p.s. Need some help figuring out your “reality?” Set up a session with me. I will call upon the wonder of the woo on your behalf.

Shine Thy Light!

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